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Date: 25 May 18 05:51pm
– Orealla struggles to hold on to its cultureClarence HenryCaptain of Orealla McLean DevairBy Neil MarksWhen the M.V Epira docked at Orealla in the dark of night, I wasn’t exactly expecting to hear the spicy Chutney song “Lootala.”But there were more “hot” tunes to come from under the sprawling benab I soon noticed, but nothing sounded “Amerindian.” In fact, Wholesale China Jerseys Free Shpping, Orealla is in a race against time to hold on to what is left of its Amerindian Heritage.It’s more than a century now since the village – the only Amerindian reservation in Region Six – had its humble beginnings. About the late 1800s, Orealla (An Arawak word meaning ‘chalk’ and pronounced, in Arawak tongue, “O-ree-a-ra) was occupied by but two families.However, when the Spanish influence gripped the community of Epira, further down the Corentyne River, its residents fled to Orealla, and formed the nucleus of what is today a community of more than 1, 000 residents.It is unclear what Amerindian nation or tribe first occupied Orealla, but the thinking among the older folks is that they were mainly Arawaks. On the hills of Orealla today, you will find mostly Warraus, and downhill, the Arawaks. In recent times, the community has welcomed a few Caribs and Wapishanas.Last weekend, the community invited all of Guyana, and whoever else would come, to observe its way of life. Orealla was chosen as this year’s Amerindian Heritage Village as the country takes the month of September to celebrate its Amerindian Heritage. This practice of highlighting a particular Amerindian village every year has been in place since 1995.Little did I know that the history of Orealla was tied to the name of the wooden vessel I would board two Thursdays ago at Crabwood Creek for the 50-mile journey up the contentious Corentyne River.I heeded the warning to turn up early so I could get a space to tie my hammock, and thus enjoy a more comfortable journey. In about four hours, light was spotted, and M.V Epira made the final turn to dock. Then, the saucy Chutney number “Lootala” could be heard. A little closer, the dancers were seen under the thatched roof benab that was built specially for the Heritage celebrations.Maureen Moses turns over cassava breadThe wharf was packed with people, waiting to greet their guests. But once you made it past the benab, it was clear that Orealla was in for a weekend of pure entertainment.“One More Night” blared from a bottom house I was told is a disco; and some reggae tune I couldn’t recognize emanated from a roadside shop. The village has been enjoying electricity for the past two months.FADING CULTURETo say that Orealla is on the brink of losing its traditional life is not an exaggeration. Hardly anyone in the village can muster a line in their native language. You could be forgiven for thinking that perhaps this is the case with the younger residents; but, no.Clarence Henry, who will soon be 80 years old, is among those who wish he could speak in the Arawak tongue.‘I don’t know to speak the language, ” he said. He remembers his parents speaking Arawak, but not at home; most times, they would speak the language when they met with their peers.Judy Alpin, 30, a Warrau mother, was born at Orealla, but she too cannot speak her language. She said she has heard her parents speaking a strange language and she figures it is the language of her native people.The 70-year-old captain of the village, McLean Devair, also does not know to speak his Arawak language. In fact, it’s one of the things that poses great embarrassment for him when he attends meetings with other Amerindian leaders and hears them speaking their language.DeVair blames the original residents of Orealla for not speaking the language in everyday life. He remembers that his parents would only speak the language when they were with people of their age, but never in the home.“It makes me very sad, ” he told Kaieteur News, he said of the fast-disappearing native tongues in Orealla.You could imagine then the excitement of Pauline Sukhai, the Minister of Amerindian Affairs, when a young schoolgirl headed on stage during a ceremony and counted from one to ten in the Arawak tongue.Sukhai said reviving Amerindian languages is one of the challenges her Ministry faces, and an effort has to be made to revistalise languages, “if not anything else.”But the loss of language is not the only evidence that the way of life of the people of Orealla is changing.  The making of cassava bread, a staple in the diet of Amerindians, is now only left to the older folks.Alpin, mentioned above, said she doesn’t know to make cassava bread.Clarice France, 65, said she can make cassava bread, but most young people don’t, or refuse to learn. She admits it is hard work, but said the young people can learn, but they want the easy life.But not too far from her, Maureen Moses, 38, is keeping busy making cassava bread. She doesn’t know to speak her language, so she is trying to make good on this practice of making cassava bread so she can maintain the traditions of her foreparents.As a result, when Kaieteur News visited, she had her son Orsino, 11, involved in the act, pounding the dried cassava in a “Mata” to get it ready to go on the pan for making the cassava bread.“When we travel we feel embarrassed that we don’t know to speak our language, but at least I know to make cassava bread, ” she said, proudly.The captain of Orealla, Devair, said the village is focused on improving and modernizing its livelihood, while maintaining its traditions and culture.“We have our food, Pepperpot, we can’t live without that, ” Devair said.When it comes to wearing native clothing, as is the case in almost all of the Amerindian villages scattered in Guyana, this is almost non-existent, and has been this way for decades. The wearing of traditional Amerindian attire is reserved for special occasions as a sort of demonstration of what used to happen a long, long time ago.The evidence speaks volumes about the quickening loss of Amerindian culture, and begs the question of what serious effort is being made to preserve the distinct identity of Guyana’s first people, even if, in the words of the Amerindian Affairs Minister, this means working to revitalize the language, “if not anything else.”
Name: Pqrstuvwxy
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Date: 25 May 18 05:49pm
Old people seh that dem got different ways of thiefing. Some does thief and seh dem tek and when dem get ketch dem does put back. Sometimes de court does mek dem put back or pay back.If you look stupid you gun get rob; if you carry youself careless you gun get lash down.  De whole of Guyana full of thief man. People thiefing all about. Dem thiefing from de stores, dem thiefing from other people.Dem boys remember when one Secretary to de Treasury before Rekha carry facts that people thiefing to Jagdeo and de man tun he face. De Waterfalls paper carry a story of fraud and thiefing in Customs. Jagdeo call de boss man and ask if he got proof. When de boss man carry de file to Jagdeo in he office, he open it and all he do was smile as if fuh seh, “Leh de people thief.”Instead of tekking action, Jagdeo give back de boss man de file and tell he fuh carry de file and give de GRA head. To this day nutten happen and is business as usual. Was millions of dollars involve.People see nobody getting charge in this country fuh mekking dem hand fast so everybody trying fuh get rich overnight. Who don’t put dem hand in de treasury and people drawer, putting dem foot in people house. Some big ones keeping dem eye pun state assets and in de whole treasury. Ask Jagdeo, Cheap Soccer Jerseys, Brassington and de Bees plus Ashni wha happen to all de state assets and contracts.Dem boys hear that in almost every state institution thiefing going on. It suh rampant that de opposition asking Ashni Singh fuh justify wheh $4.5 billion from de treasury deh. And Anil seh that dem don’t have right to ask.Dem boys seh that de politicians behaving like if is dem Mooma money dem spending.People thiefing from de courts and once dem is a small one, dem getting charge but even then nobody don’t get convict.Things meet at such a stage wheh thiefing has become de norm— a way of life and that is very sickening for future generations. Decency has gone through de window. Truth went out de backdoor.That is how dem boys hear that Jagdeo plan fuh thief if he ever get into heaven.Talk half and hope hell collect he and he kavakamites.
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Date: 25 May 18 05:49pm
The Sophia woman who allegedly burnt the penis and buttocks of her six year-old son was yesterday placed on $30, 000 bail after she made an initial court appearance at the Sparendaam Magistrate’s CourtThe woman was represented by Peter Hugh and is set to return to court on December 9.The boys have been medically examined and found to have sustained second degree burns.The examination did not reveal any sexual molestation or anal trauma.The two burnt Sophia lads, aged six and five, Cheap Jerseys Wholesale, are still in the custody of the Childcare and Protection Agency.The older boy’s mother allegedly used an electric iron to burn him severely on his buttock and on his penis.The younger boy was also burned. Contrary to earlier reports the police are in receipt of an eyewitness account that the second boy’s father burnt him with the same electric iron.The man is still at large but the woman reportedly admitted to police ranks at the Turkeyen Police Station that she did indeed burn her son.The crime committed by the boys causing the treatment to be meted out was “wotlessness.”This publication understands that the woman reportedly caught the two lads experimenting in what some deem to be an unnatural act. She did not condone the experimentation.The woman upon catching the young boys apparently plugged in an electric iron and when it was hot enough repeatedly burnt the young boys on their rear and the older boy on his penis.Both of the lads underwent further medical examination that revealed that none of them had been sexually molested.The boys are reportedly alleging that the ‘wotlessness’ was learnt from an older cousin but this is yet to be ascertained.
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Date: 25 May 18 05:49pm
A male teacher, acting on a tip, Wholesale NFL Jerseys Online, found a .38 revolver  yesterday aback of the girl’s toilet at St Mary’s Secondary on Princes Street. According to the police the weapon was in a sock.Following the discovery of the weapon all of the students were rounded up in the school yard and each student and their bags searched.No other weapon was found. No one was arrested because the weapon was not found in the possession of anyone and the owner could be ascertained.
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Date: 25 May 18 05:49pm
–      Contractor pledges to employ qualified Linden workersGuyana Water Incorporated (GWI) signed a $1.7 Billion contract for the construction of two water treatment plants, booster stations and storage facilities.  The contract was awarded to Universal Earth Movers Incorporated (UEM Inc.).The works form a significant part of the Linden Water Supply Rehabilitation Programme (LWSRP) which is funded by the Government of Guyana through the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).Speaking at the contract signing at the Linden Constabulary Building, recently Chief Executive of Guyana Water Inc., Shaik Baksh stated, “I am pleased that the contractor will employ skilled and qualified Lindeners who will provide the much-needed knowledge and expertise required to execute key civil works.“It is a proud moment for all parties involved in the programme which is not only improving the quality of water provided to Lindeners, but also job opportunities for skilled persons.”According to GWI, the programme seeks to significantly enhance the quality of life experienced by the water company customers in Linden through a massive rehabilitation of the water supply system.Over the next five years, GWI will undertake a series of large-scale civil works which will include the construction of two new water treatment plants at Amelia’s Ward and Wisroc, as well as booster stations, reservoirs, and the installation of transmission mains; as well as the rehabilitation of the distribution system, including replacing leaking pipelines and service connections.Through the combination of the new treatment facilities and the reduction of leaks as well as an upgrade of the distribution system, Linden customers will experience improved water quality as well as higher levels of service.  Under the programme, GWI is also engaging a consultant to develop a strategy to reduce water loss and non- revenue water.The Linden Water Supply Rehabilitation Programme will encompass a large public education and community outreach component.“The success of the LWSRP also depends on the willingness of GWI Linden customers to partner with us on water conservation, protecting freshwater resources, Cheap Jerseys China, and maintaining safe household water supply, ” stated Chief Executive Shaik Baksh, “for customers to enjoy higher levels of service, they must avoid wastage. We will be engaging all the treated water schemes in a conservation campaign via mass media and community meetings.”“Linden customers can anticipate a robust public education thrust, including a 60-minute television documentary on the programme, ” stated the Chief Executive. “We urge them to partner with us as we strive to significantly enhance their quality of life through the improvement of the service we deliver in Linden.”
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