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Date: 22 Oct 17 09:05am
The National Library and P&P Insurance Brokers recently launched their 2012 Annual Essay and Short Story Competition.Mrs. Margaret Eastman, co-ordinator of the competition said that the National Library held its first Essay and Short Story Competition in its centennial year 2009, in keeping with its mandate to promote literacy in Guyana.The main objectives were to afford participants the opportunity to express their feelings and ideas through creative writing; foster a love for creative writing; and encourage writing as a worthwhile pastime.The competition began with three categories of participants, 9-11 years, 12-14 years and 15-17 years.  The feedback was encouraging and in 2010, there was a significant increase in the number of entries.In 2011, the 18-20 years category was introduced as a result of requests from the public.  In this year also, there was part sponsorship from P&P Insurance Brokers & Consultants Limited which has always supported the library in its many activities.“This year, we have extended the competition to include the four prisons served by the National Library, Georgetown, Timehri, New Amsterdam and Sibley Hall/Mazaruni and they are quite happy, ” said Bish Panday of Pand P Insurance Brokers.Of great significance, this year, is that Mr. Panday of P&P Insurance Brokers has decided to sponsor the entire competition.   “We must commend P&P for this step as it would help the Library immensely in its effort to promote literacy in Guyana, Authentic Jerseys Cheap, ” said Mrs Eastman.Mr. Bish Panday said that P&P was happy to fully sponsor this year’s Annual Short Story and Essay Competition being held by the National Library. He noted that P and P has a proud record of community involvement and this was another manifestation of its support.Mr. Panday noted that the competition targets four categories of youths from as young as nine years to 20 years.  The library was commended for encouraging young persons to write, which hopefully would encourage them to read something that is not happening as much as it should.He said that the benefit of reading is too numerous to mention, but it helps persons to be able to express themselves, improves their vocabulary and certainly makes them more confident in carrying on a discussion.During the presentation ceremony, previous winners read from their winning entries.  These were Candacie Holder (9-11)  Ashieka Francois (15-17) and Subraj Singh (18-25)In addition, Roylex Holder (9-11) and Subraj Singh (18-25) spoke of the benefits of the competition.  In their view, it improves participants’ ability to write clearly, think creatively and it also improves their vocabulary.
Name: Mnopqrstuv
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Date: 22 Oct 17 09:04am
Donald Trotman is a special personPull Quote: “It’s in my nature to oppose oppression and violations of freedoms and rights”By Nadia Guyadeen The dictionary defines the word “special” as extraordinary or exceptional and also as distinguished or different from what is ordinary or usual.The word special can most definitely be used to describe prominent Guyanese Attorney, Donald Trotman, a father of five, who has been in practice for more than 47 years and dedicated his energies and time towards fighting against human rights violations and trying to ensure that justice is served.Having served as a Magistrate, a Judge, partaking in many special assignments relating to human rights and holding a host of other significant posts, the 71-year-old Trotman, who received his secondary tuition at Queen’s College, says that it is his nature to fight against injustice and violations of freedoms and rights. He said it has always been his desire to see that justice is served, and that made him go into the legal profession.Barrister-at-Law Donald Trotman“I wanted to see justice served regardless of the forces that are opposed to me or the cause, ” he asserted.Trotman has gained a wealth of knowledge studying human rights; human rights in the administration of justice and playing key roles in major committees and agencies fighting for this cause.He was able to use the knowledge gathered over the years to service in Guyana, particularly as a judge, a role which he says he considers one of his greatest accomplishments.“I have a strong sense of justice and of course, correspondingly, I am strongly opposed to injustice. I have been and I am quite prepared to oppose injustice once I feel strongly that it is wrong, and to abide by the consequences.”Trotman, who hails from the East Coast Demerara village of Golden Grove, started out in the legal profession after he qualified as a barrister of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple in London in 1961.He then returned to Guyana and was called to the Bar. Young and eager, he went into practice.“I hardly really knew what to do until I started getting a few cases with the help of some of my friends and relatives, and what helped me of course in those early days of practice was that I had done my pupilage in England in the Chambers of Dean Pritt who was very well known by then in Guyana and the rest of the Commonwealth for fighting cases against oppression in the Commonwealth countries particularly in Asia, Africa and in Guyana.”According to Trotman, that apprenticeship helped him considerably to get into practice with a sort of confidence and courage to represent causes which seemed to be lost and cases which many other lawyers, young and old, did not want to take up as they thought they were too challenging.Trotman later became a Magistrate in 1966 on the East Demerara District for a short while before leaving to pursue further studies in International Law and Human Rights in the Netherlands.He then returned to Guyana and to the Magistracy for a while before going back into private practice until around 1970 when he went to the United Nations as a special delegate representing Guyana at the United Nations General Assembly, Boston Celtics Jerseys, with the specific assignment of being the Guyana Delegate on the Human Rights Committee.Trotman taking the Oath of Office to become a JudgeTrotman then went back to private practice, which he says was always his main concern, having spent much time in his early legal career in chambers in England with Dean Pritt and his pupil master, David Turner Samuels, persons who did a lot of work in representing constitutional matters and clients, criminal clients and clients from the Commonwealth who were politicians or being oppressed by their governments.In 1981, he went to the Norman Mandy Law School, which is part of the Caribbean Council of Legal Education as the Senior Tutor and later Deputy Director of the Caribbean of the Council of Legal Education.“I was there for four years and then I practiced in Jamaica for a short while and from there I went to England where I practiced for two years, during which time I also worked with Amnesty International where I was the Coordinator of the British Lawyers Campaign Against Torture and for African Affairs.”In Jamaica, Trotman was given an assignment to be the legal counsel for five newspapers who were challenging the atrocities of the Bishop Government in Grenada.He represented The Gleaner, The Nation, The Guardian, The Advocate and the Barbados Nation that were challenging various oppressions of freedom of expression and freedom of press before the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights.Justice Trotman at the opening of criminal assizes during his stint as a judgeFrom there, Trotman went to St. Vincent in 1986 where he served as Solicitor General and Director of Public Prosecutions. During that time he also got a UN related assignment to look at Human Rights in Nicaragua.“From there I went to British Virgin Islands and served as Attorney General in 1990 and there I also acted as Governor for some time during my stint as Attorney General and also Chairman of the Law Revision Commission, revising the laws of BVI.”Trotman has also done studies on human rights in the administration of justice in Africa, particularly Nigeria and Ghana, as well as in Canada.Also, he has done several studies on human rights for the Caribbean Institute for the promotion of Human Rights and for the United Nations.When he came back to Guyana, he became a judge in 1995 and stayed in that profession until 1999, then came off and returned to the BVI on a special assignment to revise and update the laws of the offshore and money laundering legislation and to head the legal division of the Financial Services Commission of the BVI, which is a body that monitors all the financial institutions in that jurisdiction.In the period between 2000 and 2006, Trotman did a very intensive and extensive enquiry on truth and reconciliation in Grenada where he was Chairman of the Commission of Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and gained a lot of experience there in developing his earlier work and education in human rights with this now more concentrated area of reconciliation after a period of oppression and atrocities and human rights violations.He presented that report to the Grenada Government and much of it was informed by the experience of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which is better known as the Bishop Tutu Commission.In addition, Trotman gained further eminence after being featured in a London publication. The book ‘The Inner Temple: A community of Communities’ was published in celebration of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple’s 400th anniversary.The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple is one of the four Inns of Court around the Royal Courts of Justice in London, which may call members to the Bar and so entitle them to practise as barristers. (The other Inns are Middle Temple, Gray’s Inn and Lincoln’s Inn.)Trotman was featured as one of the outstanding members of the Inn during the past 400 years, which included persons like Mahatma Gandhi.Moreover, apart from his several legal publications in various legal journals and presentations at legal conferences, particularly international conferences on human rights, he has done a lot of literary writing, primarily poetry.He has two books namely “Waiting for Justice” in 2008 and “Guyana and the World” which was published in 1973.Trotman was also a feature writer for the Jamaica Gleaner, writing on international and human rights topics.Human Rights, Trotman said, has always been his special interest and his specialist assignments were in the field of human rights as well.According to him, he is very much inclined to oppose oppression and violation of freedoms and violation of rights, and as such, working in the field came naturally to him.“I became informed or educated by my association with lawyers and others who were more experienced in human rights law and fighting oppression.”As a lawyer, Trotman did a lot of work in representing clients, in and out of Guyana, whom he thought their human rights and fundamental freedoms were being violated.Trotman added that he has been involved in approximately 200 such cases.He noted that he was able to use much of his experience gained out of Guyana by applying it to certain situations in Guyana, particularly his work with the United Nations Association of Guyana, both as President of the Association and Chairperson for the Association’s Committee on Human Rights and Justice.“In practice I was able to also use much of my knowledge and experience in the interpretation and application of actual cases in which I was involved or which had come to my knowledge in human rights, for instance how the human rights convention in Europe was applicable to the human provisions in our constitution, how you could interpret them or to apply them to similar violations here in Guyana in and out of the court.”According to Trotman, he was also able to use the benefit of his experience in his teaching and administration in the Caribbean law school system in guiding younger lawyers in interpreting cases and court decisions and legislation.“Also with my work as chairman of the human rights section and member of a panel of experts or the World Peace through Law centre which is headquartered in the United States of America.”He also applied his experience and knowledge in human rights by being a member of the Constitution Review Committee here in Guyana, with the particular task being to advise on the new provisions of fundamental rights and freedoms, which were going to be put in the 1980 constitution.Among his most satisfying accomplishments, Trotman said, was being President of the Inns of Court Students’ Union. “It was great, not just in being the first Guyanese to be the president of the union, but great in helping me to work and relate with a team of my fellow students from all over the Commonwealth and being able to sit down and decide and understand various points of view, however much we differed.”“Apart from that I consider my greatest achievement in my professional legal career was to be Judge of the Supreme Court of Guyana and being legal counsel for five newspapers as well as Chairman of Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Grenada.”“I feel that I have had an impact on people both in and out of Guyana with respect to human rights advocacy and representation, and standing against atrocities and oppression and violation of freedoms, by giving people the courage to oppose these violations when they occur and to know that they could have the support and representation of others in their cause.“And of course in my teaching at the law school where I had to tutor and advise hundreds of students. I would like to feel that they must have gained something from my ideas and the way I informed them on how the law works.”Trotman also said that he feels that one of his main contributions in Guyana was to be involved in a process of reconciliation of the different factions in our society, which are detrimental to harmony, progress and development.
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Date: 22 Oct 17 09:04am
The Guyana Police Force is refuting allegations that a carjacking victim had to wait until ranks finished buying from a Chinese restaurant before responding to his report.In an article in last Monday’s edition of this publication, Fharis Mohamed claimed that police were tardy in responding to his report, and that they failed to put up roadblocks to thwart the carjacker. The incident occurred two Mondays ago in Diamond Housing Scheme.In a release issued yesterday, it was stated that the Force was “vigorously disputing the allegation that the ranks of the police mobile patrol were at a Chinese restaurant at the time when they were contacted by the victim, and that he had to wait until they were finished purchasing food and drinks before any action was taken on his report, as is claimed in the article.”According to the release, the issue of the patrol ranks being at a Chinese restaurant “is apparently a new dimension added to the matter, as it was raised and dealt with at a Community Outreach Meeting held by the Divisional Commander on Saturday November 22, 2014, Air Max 97, at the Diamond Secondary School, “and nothing of the sort was mentioned.”“The Guyana Police Force wishes to clarify that upon receipt of the report, and taking into consideration the time that had elapsed since the commission of the alleged carjacking, the decision was taken by the patrol ranks at that stage to immediately inform other police patrols and stations of the incident via the radio communications network, rather than to pursue the perpetrator, ” the release said.“Efforts are continuing to be made in order to recover the stolen motor vehicle, which has not been located so far.”Mohammed, who works with an Eleventh Avenue, Diamond Housing Scheme, East Bank Demerara taxi service, said he had to watch helplessly as a gun-toting carjacker escaped with his Toyota Spacio. He had bought the vehicle some two weeks ago.Mohamed said that the incident occurred a few yards from his place of employment around 20:45 hours, two Mondays ago.The driver said that he was in his vehicle, PSS 9658, near Eleventh Avenue, Diamond Housing Scheme, when a gunman opened the door and snatched his cellular phone.“The gunman then told me to exit the vehicle and I pleaded and cooperated with the gunman for him not to shoot. However, just as the gunman drove off, I called a taxi service at the head of the scheme to inform them my car was just hijacked, ” he said.Mohammed said he also called a friend who was “just around the corner” and they were planning to pursue the stolen vehicle. Instead, he saw a police patrol van in front of a Chinese restaurant on Ninth Avenue and sought help from them.Mohamed said that the policemen promised to send transmissions to all police outlets. The taxi driver said he then asked the Police to chase after the vehicle and “their exact words were that their vehicle can’t do that because it can’t drive speed and it doesn’t pick up fast enough.”He claimed that he then had to wait until the ranks had finished purchasing food and drinks at the restaurant before they instructed him to go to Diamond/Grove Police Station and lodge a report.At that station, Mohammed said ranks took a report and when he asked if they had heard the “transmission” they said no. He told this publication that it was then that the policemen proceeded to send a transmission which Mohamed heard other stations acknowledging.“The police said they were going to have roadblocks. I then had a few friends with me and we began to patrol the road from Diamond to Le Repentir Cemetery which we saw no road blocks, ” Mohammed said.He went on to note that the owner of A&A Cabs who was coming from his residence in Tuschen Housing Scheme, East Bank Essequibo, had stopped and informed several stations along the way of the carjacking.According to him, the taxi service owner did not see any road blocks.“Some of my friends’ cars patrolled from Diamond to Soesdyke, Diamond to Mocha and Le Repentir Cemetery and not any roadblock, ” he said.
Name: Ijklmnopqr
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Date: 22 Oct 17 09:04am
Rohee sit down at he press conference and claim how crime on de increase. He talk about all dem robberies that does happen every day and how Soulja Bai ain’t got control over crime. Is now people seh that Rohee right.De difference is that when ordinary people get rob, de police does be slow to act. When Rohee get rob, two truckload of police does respond so fast that de bandits barely dodge de corner. Dem reach home before Rohee and he outriders.Dem boys want to know if de robbery wasn’t a setup thing. De house got nuff security. It got a high fence and grill all round de place. De place been like that fuh years. Nobody ever try to enter.This one time two maids deh home and dem lef de front gate and de back door open fuh de first time. That is exactly when somebody rent a car, drive to de open gate and get de bandits to run up this back step and through de back door that open.Dem boys seh that is a woman rent de car and when de robbery done she carry it back she tell dem how de car malfunction. De police find de car and it was wukking, Cheap NFL Jerseys, but dem can’t find de woman.De house dem deh close together. De neighbours can hear you when you whisper, but these men get in de house, beat de maids, tie dem up and walk out de house and nobody ain’t notice. How come strange people can walk in and out of a house and nobody ain’t see?Rohee seh that de people didn’t tek de guns he had in de house. Dem boys watching this Nancy story closely. Dem sure that Rohee just looking fuh some publicity. And he get it. Now everybody watching he house round de clock. Dem boys want to see who more gun try fuh rob him.Talk half and don’t tek you eye off Rohee house.
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Date: 22 Oct 17 09:03am
-spent average $200, 000 monthlySince taking up the top position of the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission (GGMC) last year, Chairman, Clinton Williams, racked up entertainment expenses of almost $4M in 18 months.GGMC’ Chairman, Clinton WilliamsAccording to figures detailing the expenses between January 2014 and up to just before the elections in May 2015,   he spent $3, 984, Cheap NFL Jerseys China, 948 in three restaurants – Silhouette Restaurant (JR Enterprise) in Kitty; 704 Sports Bar on Lamaha Street and Brasil Churrascari and Pizzaria, Alexander Street, Lacytown.The figures are raising eyebrows. For example, in February last year, over $650, 000 was spent on meals and beverages at the 704 Sports Bar. There was no explanation.Earlier in 2014, some investors in Trinidad met at Silhouette. The bill came up to $311, 163. It appeared that the then Minister of Natural Resources, Robert Persaud, was present at the meeting, according to the details.In May 2014, over $100, 000 was spent in dinner alone.There was a buffet dinner at Silhouette in October for $568, 397. That same month, another one was held with the bill amounting to $420, 297.None of the Silhouette Restaurant bills were below $15, 000.The entertainment expenses last year alone charged to GGMC was $3, 142, 862.This year, just before the elections, more than $840, 000 was spent on food and drinks.In April, meals supplied for a particular occasion was almost $200, 000 with more than $100, 000 spent for dinner one day in February.GGMC is facing fire for its management of the country’s mining and other natural resources, excluding forestry.A number of reports had pointed fingers at possible wrongdoings, staff shortages and discrimination with miners and lands.Miners themselves have been complaining about GGMC’s monitoring of the mining camps.Williams had ordered an investigation and led a vote of no confidence against the GGMC Commissioner, Rickford Vieira, and others.Vieira, according to a source in the GGMC, had restricted the spending by Williams. This happened after the elections which led to a change in the administration.Vieira was sent on administrative leave by Minister Raphael Trotman, pending a review.The entertainment expenses
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